Beyond the Pale (Sourcing Beyond Linkedin)


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As a sourcer, if you are only using one tool to find candidates, then you are severely limiting your possibilities. Don’t get me wrong, Linkedin is a great sourcing tool, but it should be used in conjunction with many others. I listen to many corporate staffing managers talk about their push to get more candidates from passive sourcing. But when you delve deeper, you find out that sourcers and recruiters are still spending 90-95 percent of their time on Linkedin. Continue reading

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Why Recruiters Need to Step Up their Sourcing Game

The Problem

So this is something that I think (and hope) everyone should be doing in their power to accept, change, and implement. The landscape of recruiting today is light-years removed from the free-wheelin’ early 90’s, where many “old school” recruiters could take on the world with their phone, a rolodex, and maybe a Hotjobs account (with an accompanying action figure).

That time has passed, if it ever should have even existed before in the first place. The top 2 complaints that engineering candidates have about recruiters are:

  1. They never follow up with candidates about steps in the hiring process
  2. They try to sell candidates a job that they know nothing about

And as you might have guessed, your hiring managers will NOT be happy if they hear about those complaints.

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As recruiters, we have to master several different skills/abilities in order to be a “good recruiter”. Someone who is an aggressive telemarketer or door-to-door salesman will not cut it. You might get your foot in the door, but without technical, sourcing, and company knowledge, you will get the door slam in your face.

The “Old School” Solution

If we go with the “traditional” definition of the recruiter’s skills, they are (or should be):

  • Sherlock Holmes-level interviewing skills
  • Candidate management down to the smallest details
  • Being the face of the company (and/or culture)
  • Selling the best aspects of the job and sometimes having to clarify (or spin) the negative ones

The main problem lies with the lack of job understanding and technical knowledge. Sure, you can sell. But the “selling ice to Eskimos” approach only goes so far. People will catch on pretty quickly that you are buzzwording their resume to match your job. The fact is, that candidates have many choices when dealing with companies, and they do not have to deal with just you. Continue reading

Recruiting a Candidate with Ruby (not slippers)

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These days, everybody is looking for candidates with Ruby programming experience.  But if you are a Recruiter or Sourcer who doesn’t understand what Ruby is and the many different places it can be used, you might end up selling the wrong job to the wrong person.  You also may ask the wrong questions about the things that the candidate will be working on in their job.  As a recruiter, nothing is worse that not understanding the job you are recruiting for.  The days of “I am a great recruiter and I can recruit for anything even if I don’t understand it” are long over.

Technology

Ruby is based off of Perl, Eiffel, and Lisp.  The Ruby programming language is a very versatile object oriented language that can be used for:

  • Stand alone applications like those written in C, Java, C++, etc.
  • Test automation frameworks like Perl Frameworks, Junit Frameworks, Python Frameworks, etc.
  • Web application frameworks similar to PHP, ASP.NET, Java Server Pages, Python pages, Perl pages, Cold Fusion, etc.
  • Shell commands similar to bash, korn shell, bourne, etc.

There are other uses besides these, but these are the most common ones that we see companies implementing.  Now inevitably when you talk about one technology topic, you end up talking about others.  So here is a more in-depth explanation of the list of things that Ruby can be used in: Continue reading